Poor Sanitation in India May Contribute to MalnutritionChildren With Malnutrition – NYTimes.com

Poor Sanitation Linked to Malnutrition in India

New research on malnutrition, which leads to childhood stunting, suggests that a root cause may be an abundance of human waste polluting soil and water, rather than a scarcity of food

Poor Sanitation in India May Afflict Well-Fed Children With Malnutrition – NYTimes.com.

“Pronouns must agree with their antecedents in number and gender”

… or so the rule goes. But while we hear the plural, inclusive “they” used often in speech for indefinite reference, how do we refer to specific individuals? And can we prescribe pronouns? A linguist from the University of Illinois is quoted as saying that prescribing usually doesn’t work.

Vancouver School Board’s genderless pronouns — xe, xem, xyr — not likely to stick, if history is any indication | National Post.

The writer-addict gives insight about the actor-addict

The Wrestler — Profiles in Vain — Medium.

David Carr writes about the media for The New York Times. He’s also a recovering addict. He is uniquely qualified to weigh in after the death of actor Phillip Seymour Hoffman. His essay on medium.com is a 5-minute read. But this quote takes just 12 seconds:

I have no certainty about what went wrong, but I can tell you from personal experience that what happened was not the plan. I have been alone in that room with my addled thoughts, the drugs, and the needle. Addicts in the grip always have a plan. I will do this, get this out of the way, and then I will resume life among the living — the place where family, friends and colleagues wait and hope. He didn’t make it back to that place.

May the next one make it back.

 

Twitter description in profile story of U.N. ambassador

With even the Kenyan military and the hostage takers using Twitter in this current siege, I’m contemplating the many ways Twitter shapes not just the news, but so many communications. Then along comes this paragraph in The New York Times, from a profile story about Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations:

Friends say she is unaccustomed to being called Madam Ambassador, or to having people rise when she enters a room. Her @AmbassadorPower Twitter account provides a hint of how she sees herself. “United States ambassador to the United Nations,” it reads. “Mother, human rights defender, teacher, writer and member of the @RedSox nation.”

A New U.S. Player, Put on World Stage by Syria – NYTimes.com.

I didn’t know her name

This story of a life shows the struggles of young scientists, women scientists and those who cross the line of “conventional” science. Dr. Pert also was quotable and had a sense of humor. That helps in communicating about science. Now I know her name, from her obituary in The Washington Post.

Candace B. Pert, neuroscientist who discovered opiate receptor, dies at 67 – The Washington Post.